Limitless Worlds

Limitless Worlds

Wednesday, August 25, 2021

Coming Soon: Nightcrawlers!


I know it has been a while, but I have exciting news - my new game, Nightcrawlers, is getting published through Exalted Funeral!

Nightcrawlers is a splatterpunk roleplaying game in the style of Nightlife and Nightbane where you play as classic monsters fighting against corrupt cops, sanity-blasting monstrosities and other monsters that want to destroy humanity!

The system is based on the Black Hack and features 10 supernatural broods to play as, as well as a host of powers and tools for quick play!

The art is being done by the amazing Sally Cantirino, who has done art for great comics like I Walk With Monsters.

I am aiming for an October release, and the game is probably 90% done aside from art. It'll be available in print via Exalted Funeral and also via pdf.

Keep an eye out for more news, and maybe some previews! You can also check out my itch (tanneryea.itch.io) for an alpha version that's 100% free.

Keep it slimy!

Tuesday, February 2, 2021

Old School Essentials: Demi-Human Subraces

Old School Essentials is a really cool game, and I've been tinkering with it lately. Below, I thought I'd whip up some of the classic sub-races of AD&D demihumans. These are templates to lay over the races provided in OSE Advanced. Unless otherwise stated, most of the abilities are in addition to a race's standard abilities.

Dwarves

The common dwarf is called a "hill dwarf" and has the same abilities as a normal dwarf.

Mountain

Mountain dwarves are slightly taller and more long-lived than their hill dwarf cousins. Otherwise, they are the same as a hill dwarf. They can only reach level 9 as a Fighter

Elves

The common elf is called a "high elf" and has the same abilities as a normal elf.

Gray

Sometimes called "faerie" or "sidhe", gray elves are more mysterious and aloof than high elves. Instead of normal elven ability modifiers, they gain a +1 to Intelligence. They can reach level 12 as a Magic-User.

Wood

Sometimes called "sylvan elves", wood elves are reclusive and more in-tune with the natural world than high elves. Instead of normal elven ability modifiers, they gain a +1 to Strength and a -1 to Intelligence. They are able to speak Alignment, Common, Elvish, Treant, and the language of woodland mammals instead of normal elven languages. They can reach level 8 as a Fighter, but can only reach level 9 as a Magic-User.

Wild

Wild elves are almost primitive, even avoiding contact with other elves. Instead of normal elven ability modifiers, they gain a +2 to Strength. Wild elves can interact with animals as if the Animal Friendship spell was in effect. They also have a 90% chance to set snares, pits, and traps in a wilderness setting. They are able to speak Alignment, Common, and Elvish instead of normal elven languages. They can reach level 7 as a Druid, level 9 as a Fighter, and they can not be Magic-Users.

Halflings

The common halfling is called a "hairfoot" and has the same abilities as a normal halfling.

Stout

Stout halflings are stockier and smaller than hairfoot halflings. Stout halflings have infravision and can detect construction tricks like gnomes. They can speak Dwarven in addition to their other languages. Stout halflings can reach level 7 as a Fighter.

Tallfellow

Tallfellow halflings are thinner and taller than hairfoot halflings. They can speak Elven in addition to their other languages. Tallfellow halflings can reach level 8 as a Fighter.

Gnome

The common gnome is called a "hill gnome" and has the same abilities as a normal gnome.

Forest

Forest gnomes, as their name suggests, live in the forests of the world instead of underground. Instead of being able to detect construction tricks, forest gnomes have a 4-in-6 chance to blend in with wooded underbrush, effectively making them invisible. Instead of burrowing mammals, forest gnomes can speak with small, woodland animals such as foxes, squirrels, rabbits, mice, etc. They can reach level 7 as a druid, but can not be Clerics.


Friday, January 22, 2021

The Hero's Journey 1e: Gnome Race


Back with more The Hero's Journey stuff, and this time it's for the gnome! The gnome is actually based on the gnome from the second edition of THJ, which I heard from James Spahn was inspired by a draft for a gnome race for the first edition. These gnomes lean more towards the weird tinkerers/illusionists side of the race than anything.

The class level restrictions are somewhat shots-in-the-dark. If I get around to making an Illusionist class (not off the table, but I'd have to do spells), they'd get 10 levels in that instead of Wizard. Anyway, let me know what you think!

Gnome


Attribute

Dice Pool

Strength

2d6+1

Dexterity

3d6

Constitution

3d6

Intelligence

2d6+6

Willpower

3d6

Charisma

3d6

Appearance

3d6

Luck

3d6



Class

Level Limit

Acrobat

-

Assassin

4

Barbarian

-

Bard

7

Cavalier

4

Cleric

-

Druid

4

Duelist

7

Fighter

4

Jester

7

Monk

-

Paladin

-

Ranger

5

Thief

7

Wizard

10

Combat Curiosity: Gnomes are able to wield short blades and light crossbows, regardless of other class restrictions.

Illusionist: Gnomes are naturally skilled in illusions and deception. Up to three times per day, a Gnome can use the Phantasmal Force spell. This spell functions as if cast by a Level 1 Wizard.

Lifetime of Study: Because they have spent their life pursuing knowledge, all gnomes may use the Lore ability as if they were a 1st level bard. Gnomish bards receive a +1 to their Lore class ability. This ability cannot increase the Lore ability above 5

Instinctive Archaeologist: Gnomes have a sharp eye for ancient caverns, strange architecture, and crumbled ruins. They can detect secret or concealed doors, sloping stone passages, unusual stonecraft, and even large-scale mechanical constructs on a 1-2 on 1d6 simply by passing within 10 feet of them. This chance increases to 1-4 on 1d6 if they are actively searching for these things. In addition, gnomes can discern and operate large scale mechanical constructs and devices if they make a successful Lore check.

Hard To Hit: Gnomes receive a −2 [+2] bonus to their Armor Class due to their small size and quick reflexes. They also receive a +1 bonus “to-hit” when attacking foes which are man-sized or larger.

Dark Vision: Gnomes can see in starlight, moonlight, or perfect darkness at a distance of up to 90 feet.

Wednesday, January 20, 2021

The Hero's Journey 1e: Assassin Class


 James Spahn put out a great OSR game a few years ago called The Hero's Journey, and I love the thing. The newest edition of it is great too, but far more focused on Tolkien-esque adventures than traditional D&D stuff. 

The old edition has a ton of classes, but one I thought could be included: the Assassin! This is based on the Swords and Wizardry Complete version of the class, as well as taking some cues from the White Box Heroes fan supplement for Swords and Wizardry White Box. Let me know what you think!

Assassin

Level

XP

HD

BHB

ST

Thievery

1

0

1d6

+0

14

-

2

1,500

1d6

+0

13

-

3

3,000

1d6

+0

12

1

4

6,000

+2

+1

11

1

5

12,000

+1

+1

10

2

6

24,000

+2

+2

9

2

7

48,000

+1

+2

8

3

8

96,000

+2

+3

7

3

9

192,000

+1

+4

6

4

10

384,000

+2

+5

5

4


Requirements:
Dexterity 8, Strength 8, Intelligence 8, Non-lawful Alignment
Level Limits: Dwarf 4, Elf 5, Half-Elf 7, Half-Orc 10, Human 10. Halflings can not be Assassins

Weapon/Armor Restrictions: Assassins are proficient, agile fighters when things go belly up. They can wield any weapon or shield, but they can only wear leather armor. 

Thievery (3rd): Starting at 3rd level, an Assassin can use the Thievery ability as a Thief of two levels lower. 

Disguise: Assassins are extremely proficient at disguise, more so than any other class. Anyone meeting the disguised Assassin has a 1-in-20 chance of seeing through the disguise (or 2-in-20 if disguised as someone of a different gender identity). 

Back Stab: Any time an Assassin attacks an opponent who is unaware of their presence, the Assassin receives a +2 bonus to their Base Hit Bonus. If the attack is successful, the Assassin doubles the damage rolled and ignores his target’s Reduction Value. 

Poison: Assassins are knowledgeable in the use of poisons. If an Assassin has access to poison, they have no risk of accidentally poisoning themselves when applying the poison to a weapon. 

Saving Throw: Assassins gain a +2 bonus on saving throws vs. death and poison. 

Establish Guild (9th): At 9th level, the Assassin may establish (or take over) a guild of Assassins. The guild need not be located in a large city, and can even be established as a barony in the wilderness. However, if the new guild is within the territory of an existing guild, there will unquestionably be a battle to the death between them. Assassins’ Guilds do not – ever – share their territory. An existing guild of Assassins will generally not accept the leadership of a new Guildmaster who does not claim that rank by killing the former Guildmaster.

XP Bonus for Dexterity: An Assassin with a Dexterity of 15 or higher receives a 5% bonus to all experience points earned.

Saturday, October 3, 2020

FASERIP - Weaknesses


Hey all, hope you are doing well! A quick post today - I'm going to be running Blacky the Blackball's excellent FASERIP with a group soon, and I wanted to work up some Drawback rules to provide an option for the players.

FASERIP is based on the Marvel Superheroes RPG from the 80s, and it is interesting because aside from a few exceptions - like Daredevil - very few Marvel heroes have explicit 'weaknesses'. Seems to be much more of a DC thing. 

The rules are somewhat cribbed from 4C Expanded, an expansion to the original MSH retroclone. Hope you get some use out of these, as I think they are pretty neat!

Drawbacks

A Drawback is very similar to a Limit, save that the Drawback affects the whole character rather than a specific power. The line between a Drawback and a Limit can be hard to draw sometimes - for example, while Daredevil's blindness would be considered a Drawback, something like Thor's Mjolnir would be a limit. Generally if the vulnerability affects the whole character and not a specific power, it's a Drawback.

Obtaining a Drawback is optional at character creation, and it's recommended that no character start with more than one (there's nothing stopping you from taking multiple ones, but the character just becomes a headache to play). In exchange for taking a Drawback, a character can:

  • Acquire a new power of their choice at Campaign Rank -1 RS
  • Boost any existing power or ability
  • Acquire any two: 
    • Wealth +1RS
    • Fame +1RS
    • A new Specialty or +1RS to an existing Specialty
    • A new Contact
Drawback In Play

If a Drawback ever becomes relevant in play, if a player works through the Drawback or becomes affected by it, the GM may award them Karma. The amount of Karma varies on the severity of the exposure of event, but generally anywhere from 30 to 70 Karma may be appropriate.

Example Drawbacks

This is only a small sampling of Drawbacks, and players and GMs are encouraged to create their own, similar to limits.

Addiction: The character is addicted to a specific substance or activity, such as alcohol, drugs, sex, gambling and so on. If a character goes an extended period of time without engaging in the substance/activity, they suffer a -2RS to all social interaction rolls until they satisfy their craving.

Arch-Enemy: The character has a rival or enemy who constantly plans their downfall. The arch-enemy tends to be a major thorn in their side and will often come out of the woodwork at the most unexpected - and inconvenient - times.

Marked: The character has some kind of obvious marking or branding that indicates they have been shamed, punished or something similar. When the mark is visible, the player suffers -2RS to any feats of Fame.

Physical Impediment: The character has some sort of physical handicap. This could include things like blindness, deafness, lost limbs, wheelchair use, and so on. When a character must attempt a feat that involves the impediment, they have -3 RS.

Trouble Past: The character is haunted by a terrible event in their past. When encountering a situation that could remind them of this event, they suffer -1 RS to all actions until the situation is resolved or the character can 'snap out of it'.

Weakness: The character has a weakness or vulnerability to a certain substance, energy, object or stimulus. When exposed to the weakness, they suffer -1 to -5 RS (depending on the amount/quality of the weakness) to all feats until the weakness is removed from their presence.

Tuesday, July 7, 2020

Old World of Iron: Border Princes pt. 2 and the Borderlands


So I just had an interesting idea about the Border Princes, and I think this is how I'm going to pursue them.

I'm going to basically do an older version that I had considered in the past, previously titled the Marcher Baronies but now called the Borderlands. The Borderlands will, in fact, be very similar to the Border Princes but with a few caveats. For example, there are established kingdoms in the Borderlands - not many, but they are there. Further, the Borderlands will basically combined the Border Princes and the Badlands into one thing - parts of the Borderlands will also be inhabited by goblinoids come over from the Land of Darkness (a new area I'm going to detail), but I'm not going to delineate it into south v. north.

Where does that leave Osmanli? In relatively the same place, but I'm going to move it west to where Warhammer has Araby. This will also fill out my desire to kind of do the whole Mediterranean region. My not-Egypt isn't going to get a region, as I do not really want a Tomb Kings analogue - they will instead be one of the many kingdoms that has risen and fallen in the Borderlands. Basically, the Borderlands will be more SE Europe than purely the Balkans

Old World of Iron: Norsca and Drakenlanda


What It Is

Norsca is fairly clearly supposed to be Viking Age Scandinavia. Much like the rest of the Old World, it's kind of in the wrong time period - the Viking Age was almost half a millennium before the Early Modern Period. Norsca is very much displayed as being ruled by barbarism and barely functional at all, basically home to Chaos Warriors and not much else. The game doesn't even really mention too many heroic Norscans - except, as normal, in WFRP 1e. In early Warhammer, Norscans were definitely heroes - though still painted as barbarians, the WFRP 1e World Guide explicitly states they helped the Old World during the last chaos incursion and not the other way around. Much more Conan the Barbarian instead of wildmen of the north.

The Real World

Early Modern Scandinavia is weird because they aren't really much of a major player, at least on the surface. The end of the High Middle Ages saw Sweden, Denmark and Norway forming the Kalmar Union which lasted a little more than 150 years. After that, they split into Denmark-Norway (which was pretty stable) and Sweden. Early Modern Sweden was insane - Gustavus Adolphus basically modernized the whole country, won countless wars for the Protestants, and was by some accounts a murderous madman. Before Adolphus, Scandinavia was widely considered a backwater.

My Version

Drakenlanda (aka my not-Scandinavia) is hard to divorce from the whole viking thing because honestly vikings are interesting from an RPG perspective. However, Drakenlanda is going to be much like the Kalmar Union than something like Sweden - jarls and princes led by an elected king, similar to how Iceland had. They will basically be coming out of the viking age, partially Christianized but not unified and still mysteriously pagan. Basically imagine the Vesten from 7th Sea